Smart Home Video Courses Museum Series

The smart home is with us for well over 20 years; and during that period monumental, industry-changing innovation has occurred within the smart home industry. Back in 1999, I wrote a book on the subject of home networking and worked with some really talented people to create a range of multimedia training courses on the subject. The content was created in Macromedia Flash! and was resting on a hard drive for 20 years. Even though much of the information is well out of date, I felt the itch in recent months to format these into standard video files, add some music, include some voiceover, and publish on youtube (not even an idea back in 2000). So I hope you enjoy my trip down memory lane and realize the enormous changes that have occurred over the years:

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Digital Convergence

This video sets the scene with regards to the advent of digital technologies.

Knowledge Object TitleDigital Convergence
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe the new digital economy.
– Explain how convergence and digitization have led to the emergence of digital homes.

Summary: While the Information era is all around us, it is only now being integrated into our everyday lives. The Digital revolution is causing a greater demand for networked homes. With appliances that can be adapted to digitalization already in place in the homes and a growing awareness of the importance of the Internet, more people are opting for the convenience of a home network.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Computer Networking

Here is the second video created back nearly twenty years ago on the subject of computer networking in our homes back then.

Knowledge Object TitleComputer Networking
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Provide an overview of computer networks
– List and explain the types of components that make up a standard network

Summary: Networks are set up to enable all members’ share and access data and peripheral devices attached to it. A home network is the ideal solution for multiple PC owners who wish to maximize their investments and avail of the many new program applications. All the other network users can share software applications loaded on one PC on the network. With a home network, all members can access the Internet at any time from any of the networked PCs simultaneously.

https://youtu.be/ZwfXQy-TP7c

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Definition of a Home Network

In this third video, we explain the core concepts of home network as was the case back in the early noughties.

Knowledge Object TitleDefinition of a home network
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Define a home network

Summary: The ultimate goal of a home network is to provide access to information, such as voice, audio, data, and entertainment between different digital devices all around the house. With home networking, you can save money and time. Peripherals such as printers and scanners, as well as your Internet connection, can be shared. Home networking will enhance your lifestyle by bringing new forms of entertainment and information into your home.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Motivations for Networking a Household

And here is another video in our trip into the past, where we look at the motivations behind the idea of networking electronic devices in people’s homes.

Knowledge Object TitleMotivations for networking a household
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– List and explain the factors that encourage consumers to network their homes

Summary: One of the main reasons people are networking their homes is to get the best possible use of all the PCs in their homes. As all PCs in the network are interconnected, they can share information and resources. This eliminates the need for separate devices such as printers or scanners for each PC. It also allows users simultaneous access to the Internet.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Consumer Versus Corporate User Requirements

In this fifth video in the series, Gerard examines the different smart home needs of consumers versus their business colleagues back in 2001.

Knowledge Object TitleConsumer versus corporate user requirements
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– List and explain the requirements of home networking users

Summary: A home networking environment is different to a traditional enterprise network environment. It must be a seamless invisible network that requires little or no user involvement. A consumer setting up a home network must be made aware of the reliability of the system and the scalability of the devices on the system. With no system administrator in the home, a home network must be easy to use and install.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Profiles of People Adopting Home Networks

In this sixth video in this historical series, we look at who in the world were adopting different types of networking technologies in their homes.

Knowledge Object TitleProfiles of people adopting home Networking Technologies
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Identify the different types of people who are involved in networking their homes

Summary: Home networking is one of the fastest growing sectors in the computer industry. The people opting for home networking range from self employed professionals to parents. All have one thing in common; they have more than one computer in the home. That is where the similarity ends. Home networking benefits this diverse range of people in many different ways.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Home Networking Technological components

In this seventh video in our smart home history series, Gerard narrates descriptions of what items were required to build a home network back in the early noughties.

Knowledge Object TitleHome Networking Technological components
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– List and explain the five components that make up a home network

Summary: While a wide variety of technologies exist for interconnecting devices within the home, as yet no single technology meets all of the requirements for the diversity of applications that will be created. Technological advances in recent years have increased the amount of broadband platforms consumers can use to access the Internet. The deployment of an interface device called a Residential Gateway connects the broadband local loop to the in-home network, bringing a bi-directional communications channel to every device in the home network.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Broadband in the Nineties!

In this video, we change direction slightly and look into the start of an emerging technology called Broadband 🙂

Knowledge Object TitleWhat is residential broadband
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Define the term residential broadband
– List the market drivers

Summary: Over the last couple of years the Internet has grown ubiquitous to a large number of consumers. These consumers are demanding fast connectivity technologies to access the rich multimedia content that resides on the Web. The need for fast access to the Internet is pushing the demand for broadband access. Consumers are moving away from dialing-up using their telephone lines towards new and improved connectivity platforms. Demand for high-speed Internet access solutions has fuelled the proliferation of a number of rival technologies.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Cable Broadband

So, in the late nineties, I worked with an Irish cable and Wireless TV provider, here is content that was generated about the state of the cable broadband industry at the time and plans to introduce home networking services.

Knowledge Object TitleCable TV Broadband
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– List the disadvantages of coaxial cable
– Give an outline of HFC networks

Summary: Over the last ten years, cable network operators have embarked on an extensive program to upgrade their networks to hybrid fiber/coax (HFC) architectures. One of the key advantages of the HFC architecture is the ability to carry multiple types of information in multiple formats shared by a scalable number of users.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Cable Modems

In this detailed video narration, Gerard goes under the bonnet of cable modems and how they worked 20 years ago!

Knowledge Object TitleCable Modems – Old!
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe cable modems
– Understand the basic building blocks of cable modems

Summary: There are two main methods of sending information from a set-top box back to the cable operator’s head end, namely telephone modem and the existing HFC network.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Residential Gateway Introduction

Now that we have covered general background stuff, it’s time to take a look inside a 20-year-old smart home and what devices they included. First up was residential gateways.

Knowledge Object TitleResidential Gateway Introduction
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– About residential gateways
– Define a residential gateway
– Outline the evolution of these appliances

Summary: This course is about residential gateways, for additional supplementary data, Web links, ideas for graphics, etc. Please visit the following manufacturers’ sites. Also, some graphics shown below that might be of use.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Residential Gateway Architecture

As the name implies, this video looks into a category of device that technologists around the world were planning back in the late nineties. The content goes under the bonnet, describing technical elements of these early generation smart home devices.

Knowledge Object TitleResidential Gateway Architecture
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe the architecture of a typical residential gateway

Summary: The availability of new in-home interconnection technologies combined with the explosion of non PC based appliances, is driving the demand for a single appliance that is capable of connecting in-home appliances to the public Internet – a residential gateway. It is a central entry and control point at the home for all voice, video, and data services. The argument over whether or not the residential gateway will reside in the residence or on the side of the residence will center on cost and the need for end-user interoperability.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Residential Gateway Marketplace

So in this relatively short video, we examine the content that describes the commercial aspirations for players in the residential gateway marketplace all those years ago.

Knowledge Object TitleResidential Gateway Marketplace
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe the driver and inhibitor factors affecting the growth of the Residential Gateway market.

Residential gateways sit between the access network and the in-house network and allow multiple appliances in your house to share a single connection to the Internet. The push by network operators to deploy new revenue-generating services in our homes and the widespread adoption of the Internet are among the driving factors that are contributing to the mass deployment of these appliances. Factors that inhibit the development of a buoyant residential gateway market range from lack of well-defined business models to lack of technical support systems.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Introduction to Power-line technologies

So, utilizing high-voltage technologies to connect smart devices together was another approach utilized by technologists back in olde days! Here is an introduction to sending data over home electrical wiring systems.

Knowledge Object TitleIntroduction to power-line technologies
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Discuss power-line technologies
– List and explain the advantages of home power-line systems
– List and explain the disadvantages of home power-line systems

Summary: The availability of new in-home interconnection technologies combined with the explosion of non PC based appliances, is driving the demand for a single appliance that is capable of connecting in-home appliances to the public Internet – a residential gateway. It is a central entry and control point at the home for all voice, video and data services. The argument over whether or not the residential gateway will reside in the residence or on the side of the residence will center on cost and the need for end user interoperability.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Powerline Technical Obstacles

When the engineers started enabling data over home electrical wiring systems, they encountered numerous issues. This video gives an insight into some of the challenges faced during the early days of powerline home networking.

Knowledge Object TitleTechnical obstacles to in-home power-line networks
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– List and explain the technical obstacles that the power-line medium presents.

Summary: As a signal travels across the wire it inevitably loses energy. In other words the signal gets weaker the further it must travel between the transmitting and receiving devices. Impedance refers to the resistance in flow of the alternating current in an electrical circuit.  Discontinuities, wire nuts, switches and wall socket outlets cause impedance. The addition of new appliances on a home network increases load on a home network, which creates data transmission problems.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Powerline Modems

The enablement of powerline home networking in the noughties and onwards required the use of modems; this video from the archives investigates.

Knowledge Object TitlePower-line modems
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Explain power-line modem technologies.

Summary: Home computer users can now access the Internet from two different computers simultaneously without running cables throughout the house by using innovative home networking modems that utilize home AC power outlets.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Overview of CEBus LonWorks and X-10

There were loads of standard groups vying for a piece of the smart home networking pie back all those years ago, particularly in the powerline networking standards, here is a video about some of those systems.

Knowledge Object TitleOverview of CEBus LonWorks and X-10
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe CEBus based home networks
– Describe LonWorks based home networks
– Describe X-10 based home networks

Summary: CEBus, LONWorks, and X-10 core technologies are currently the most popular technologies used to deliver data over existing electrical lines. CEBus stands for Consumer Electronics Bus is an open international standard (EIA-600) for controlling devices over different media. LONWORKS is a home-networking platform created by Echelon. X-10 is a protocol that allows compatible devices throughout a house to communicate with each other via the in-home 110V wiring system.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Phone-line Technologies Overview

Although, no longer, home technologies such as HomePNA that utilized in-home phone wiring systems were relatively popular in the late nineties and up to the mid-noughties. Here is a video from the archives that explain the evolution of phoneline smart home networking.

Knowledge Object TitlePhone-line Technologies Overview
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Provide an overview of phone-line technologies
– Outline the technical challenges associated with networking appliances using an existing phone-line wiring infrastructure.

Phoneline-based networking has emerged as one of the most viable, economical approaches to PC networking in the home. This technology allows all the components of a home network to interact over the home’s existing telephone wiring, without disturbing the existing voice or fax services. Phoneline technology transmits data between multiple phone jacks within the home.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Introduction to HomePNA

Reasonably popular in the USA around the 2000 to 2005 period, HomePNA was used by telecommuters of the time to network PCs and peripherals. Here is some background on this technology that operated well at the time.

Knowledge Object TitleIntroduction to HomePNA
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Discuss the HomePNA consortium

Summary: HomePNA has defined a standard specification that simplifies the implementation of a home network over the phone lines. HomePNA’s technology allows computers, peripherals, and other information appliances to connect with each other and the Internet without interrupting standard telephone service. Utilizing existing telephone wiring requires no costly or disruptive rewiring of the home.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – HomePNA Technical Architecture

In this video, Gerard runs through some technical content about the technologies used by the HomePNA smart home system.

Knowledge Object TitleHomePNA Technical Architecture
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe the technical architecture of HomePNA based networks

Summary: Phoneline technology currently leads the “no new wiring” technologies in product development (with existing products ranging from 1-10 Mbps). HomePNA utilizes a technology known as Frequency Division Multiplexing (FDM) which essentially divides the data traveling over the phone lines into separate frequencies — one for voice, one for high-bandwidth Internet access such as ADSL, and one for the network data. These frequencies can coexist on the same telephone line without impacting one another. All the devices on a HomePNA based home network need to include a specialized software program that communicates with a network card. This network card is connected to the phone-wiring infrastructure, which allows the HomePNA system to distribute data throughout the house.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – New Wires Home Networking Technologies

This video from the archives examines some emerging new wired based home connectivity technologies that were proving to be very useful in Smart Homes over two decades ago.

Knowledge Object TitleNew Wires Home Networking Technologies
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Give an overview of ‘new wires’ in-home networking technologies.

Summary: With the proliferation of digital television, more people around the world are beginning to distribute audio and video signals around their homes. A number of interconnection technologies are available to meet the requirements of in-home video and multimedia distribution, namely IEEE 1394, USB, and Ethernet.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – About IEEE 1394

IEEE 1394 had aspirations to penetrate the smart home market and developed a great technology along the way. Take a look at this video to understand the origins of the technology and the associated architecture used in the standard all those years ago!

Knowledge Object TitleAbout IEEE 1394
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe the architecture of a 1394 based home network
– List the benefits of 1394

Summary: The 1394 bus is a versatile, high-speed, and relatively inexpensive method of interconnecting a variety of consumer electronics devices and personal computer peripherals. One of 1394’s’ key features is its support of isochronous data transfer that provides guaranteed data transport at a pre-determined rate. This is especially important for multimedia applications, which require uninterrupted transport of time-critical data.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – About USB

The world does not need more info on USB, everybody knows about it. However, there are very few resources on the Internet that provide such an insight into this technology 20 years ago, here it is:

Knowledge Object TitleAbout USB
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe USB
– List and explain the benefits of USB
– Distinguish between USB and 1394 topologies

Summary: The Universal Serial Bus (USB) specification is a standardized peripheral connection developed by leading PC industry companies. The USB is the solution for any computer user who is looking for a hassle-free way of interconnecting their PC’s and A/V electronic devices at home. Because of these benefits, USB is enjoying broad market acceptance today and is playing a key role in the fast-growing area of home networking. USB 2.0 and 1394 primarily differ in terms of application focus. The USB 2.0 Promoter group expects USB 2.0 to be the preferred connection for most PC peripherals, whereas IEEE 1394’s primary target is audio/visual consumer electronic devices such as digital camcorders, digital VCRs, DVDs, and digital televisions.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – About Fast Ethernet

Ethernet remains the cornerstone of networks nowadays. In this video, I take you through a technical overview of Ethernet. Much of the content remains relevant to this day and is widely used in smart homes around the world.

Knowledge Object TitleAbout Fast Ethernet
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Describe the features of Fast Ethernet-based home networks.
– List and explain the benefits of Fast Ethernet.

Summary: Fast Ethernet is a standard for Ethernet networks that is capable of providing transmission speeds of up to 100Mbps. Fast Ethernet supports high bandwidth in-home applications. It can network a host of appliances reliably and efficiently. It is supported by many companies in the home networking market.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Understanding OSGi

Another blast from the past here is OSGi and the aspiring smart home standard that has evolved over the years. Here is a look at the early days of the technology.

Knowledge Object TitleUnderstanding OSGi
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Provide an overview of the OSGi group
– Describe the components of an OSGi network

Summary: The Open Services Gateway Initiative (OSGi) is an industry group working to define and promote an open standard for connecting the coming generation of smart consumer and small business appliances with commercial Internet services. The OSGi specification, which complements virtually all-residential networking standards, defines an open standard that enables multiple software services to be loaded and run on a services gateway such as a set-top box, cable modem, DSL modem, PC, or dedicated residential gateway. The OSGi architecture is based on requirements from several new markets. The major components include a Services gateway, Service provider, Service aggregator, Gateway operator, Wide area network (WAN) and carrier/ISP, Local devices, and networks.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Understanding Bluetooth

Bluetooth has a big presence in the smart home, if you want to know some more about this protocol origins, check out this video on the subject from 2001.

Knowledge Object TitleUnderstanding Bluetooth
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Provide an overview of Bluetooth

Summary: Bluetooth technology is an open specification for wireless communication of data and voice. It is based on a low-cost short-range radio link, which is built into a small microchip. It facilitates ad-hoc connections for stationary and mobile communication environments. It operates in a globally available frequency band ensuring communication compatibility worldwide. Bluetooth technology allows for the replacement of many of the proprietary cables used today for interconnecting devices. Printers, PDAs desktop PCs, handheld PCs, fax machines, joysticks, keyboards and any other digital devices can be part of a Bluetooth system.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Inside Bluetooth

As the name implies, Gerard takes a peek inside the Bluetooth protocol as it was in 2000/2001.

Knowledge Object TitleInside Bluetooth
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Understand the inner workings of how Bluetooth was designed initially.

Summary: Bluetooth is an open specification for wireless communication of data and voice. It allows for the replacement of the many proprietary cables that connect one device to another with one universal short-range radio link.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – How Bluetooth Works

In this video, Gerard explains the building blocks of Bluetooth in the early days of the smart home.

Knowledge Object TitleHow Bluetooth Works
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– In this video, Gerard explains the building blocks of Bluetooth in the early days.

Summary: Elements of a Bluetooth based home network include:

  • Personal Area Networks
  • Piconets
  • Scatternets
  • Software Framework

Bluetooth was originally conceived to replace the myriad of cables that are synonymous with a PC based home network. However, as the Bluetooth evolved it became clear that it would also enable a very new networking paradigm – Personal Area Networks (PANs). With PAN technology, a home networking user is able to organize a collection of personal electronic products (their PDA, cell phone, laptop, desktop, MP3 player, etc.) to automatically work together. Over time, PANs will revolutionize the user experience of consumer electronics.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Understanding Universal Plug and Play

Another popular protocol that emerged out of the early tech days was UPnP. Here is a video, where I step back in history and narrate content created many years ago, enjoy!

Knowledge Object TitleUnderstanding Universal Plug and Play
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– To provide an overview of Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) and how it works.

Summary: UPnP is an open standard home networking technology that can be used by appliances such as telephones, televisions, printers, and game consoles to exchange and replicate relevant data between themselves and PCs on the network.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Protocols used by UPnP

Here is deep dive into the protocols used to construct UPnP in 2001!

Knowledge Object TitleProtocols used by UPnP
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– List and explain the Internet protocols used by UPnP

Summary: Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is a scheme to bring zero-configuration connectivity to networked devices from multiple vendors. The open networking architecture of UPnP reuses existing protocols and technologies to provide easy to use, flexible, and standards-based connectivity to all consumer networks.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Introduction to WLANs

Here is a snapshot of Wireless networks in the early days.

Knowledge Object TitleIntroduction to WLANs
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Give a comprehensive overview of Wireless LANs

Summary: Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) are both flexible and mobile, yet they provide all the functionality of wired LANs. A WLAN is comparable to a cordless telephone, where the user can move about and still be able to use the telephone. They operate as either an extension of or an alternative to wired networks. They have strong popularity in vertical markets such as telecommuting, SOHOs, health-care, retail, manufacturing, warehousing, and academia, where productivity gains are realized by using hand-held devices and notebook PCs to transmit real-time information to centralized hosts for processing.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – IEEE 802.11 Wireless Standards

And here we go with a video on life over at IEEE back in the early years of the noughties!

Knowledge Object TitleIEEE 802.11 Wireless Standards
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Specify the main characteristics of home networks based on the IEEE 802.11 WLAN standard.

Summary: Some of the popular WLAN technologies are IEEE 802.11 and HiperLAN/2. IEEE 802.11 addresses the 2.4 and 5GHz WLAN market. WLANs that use one of the IEEE 802.11 specifications are easily installed and configured and can be moved from place to place with ease. The tried and tested methods for securing wired networks will also work very well for wireless networks.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Understanding PSTN and ISDN

This video was written during an era when PSTN and ISDN were the two prominent means of accessing the Internet!

Knowledge Object TitleUnderstanding PSTN and ISDN
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Give an overview of PSTN
– Describe ISDN networks

Summary: In reality, phone wires are capable of carrying millions of bits of information per second. Short for plain old telephone service, PSTN refers to the standard telephone service that most households use on a daily basis. In contrast to PSTN, ISDN is a high-speed digital communications system.
ISDN involves the digitization of the telephone network using a set of standard communication protocols. ISDN services are aimed at both businesses and private residential users.

Smart Home Courses Museum Series – Understanding xDSL

Here is some legacy content on a broadband technology that was to enable the proliferation of smart homes throughout the globe over the past number of years.

Knowledge Object TitleUnderstanding xDSL
Learning ObjectiveAfter completing this knowledge object, you will be able to:
– Give an overview of ADSL
– List the characteristics of ADSL
– Describe the equipment in ADSL
– Explain frequency allocation
– Describe G.lite based broadband services

Summary: Asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) is a modem technology that enables telecommunication providers to deliver high bandwidth services over existing copper telephone lines. It can be used to deliver Internet content and rich video on demand services to digital appliances connected to your in-house network. Typical test trials of ADSL show downstream data transmission rates of between 6 and 8 Mbps and upstream rates between 640 and 800 Kbps. These factors are dependent on line length and the capabilities of the modem that is connected to your in-house network.  DMT is the most widely used ADSL modulation scheme and appears to be becoming the industry standard.

Also known as Universal ADSL, G.Lite is a version of ADSL that is focused on the home networking market. It is capable of providing data over existing phone lines at rates of up to 1.5 Mbps downstream and 512 Kbps upstream. G.Lite is based on the same underlying technology as standard ADSL. Unlike ADSL, G.Lite does not require the installation of a specialized piece of hardware called a splitter. G.Lite is more cost-effective than full-rate ADSL.

Hope you enjoyed the glimpse into the early days of some technologies that were to become the building blocks of the Smart Home we know and love today.

Click Here if you’d like to start your own smart home journey. Thanks, Gerard

ICT professional, Author, Serial Internet Entrepreneur, Investor, Smart Home Enthusiast, and Creator!

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